[Directory] [Data...]

Data server object:  TOS




  
    Total organic sulfur (TOS) collected from Niskin bottle samples on R/V Knorr cruise KN210-04 in the Western Atlantic Ocean between Uruguay and Barbados from March to May 2013 (Deep Atlantic DOM project)
    
  
  
    
    

Total organic sulfur (TOS) collected from Niskin bottle samples on R/V Knorr cruise KN210-04 in the Western Atlantic Ocean between Uruguay and Barbados from March to May 2013 (Deep Atlantic DOM project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/745536
Data Type: Cruise Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2018-09-04

Project
» Dissolved Organic Matter Composition in the Deep Atlantic Ocean (Deep Atlantic DOM)

Program
» Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Kujawinski, ElizabethWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)Principal Investigator
Longnecker, KristaWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)Co-Principal Investigator, Contact
Rauch, ShannonWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
This dataset contains the concentration of total organic sulfur (TOS) in seawater from samples collected during the R/V Knorr cruise KN210-04 between 29 Mar 2013 and 06 May 2013 along the eastern coast of South America.


Coverage

Spatial Extent: N:9.700333 E:-28.502444 S:-37.998253 W:-55.29925
Temporal Extent: 2013-03-27 - 2013-05-04

Dataset Description

This dataset contains the concentration of total organic sulfur in seawater from samples collected during the R/V Knorr cruise KN210-04 between 29 Mar 2013 and 06 May 2013 along the eastern coast of South America.


Acquisition Description

Whole seawater samples for obtaining the concentration of total organic sulfur (TOS) were collected directly from the Niskin bottles into combusted 40 mL glass vials. The vials were stored frozen (-20°C) until analysis on land.

TOS was determined as described in Cutter et al. In brief, a sample is pumped through three ion exchange cartridges connected in series, a 1 mL Ba (Dionex OnGuard II #057093) to remove most of the sulfate, then through a 2.5 mL Ag (Dionex OnGuard II Ag #057090) to remove chloride, and finally through a 1 mL cartridge packed with BioRad AG 4x4 resin (#143-3341) to remove the remaining sulfate. The resulting sample is then analyzed via ion chromatography to quantify remaining sulfate. Total sulfur is quantitatively converted to H2S by via reductive pyrolysis in pure hydrogen gas and quantified by gas chromatography/flame photometric detection using the trapping /detection system of Radford-Knoery and Cutter. Total organic sulfur is calculated as the difference between total sulfur and residual sulfate. Each step of this analysis has an error attached. The units for TOS are nM; when provided, TOS_sd is the standard deviation of the average for replicate samples. Precision was >10% RSD at/above 200 nM S and the detection limit was 26 nM S.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Related Publications

Cutter, G. A., Cutter, L. S., & Filippino, K. C. (2004). Sources and cycling of carbonyl sulfide in the Sargasso Sea. Limnology and Oceanography, 49(2), 555–565. doi:10.4319/lo.2004.49.2.0555
Radford-Knoery, J., & Cutter, G. A. (1993). Determination of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen sulfide species in natural waters using specialized collection procedures and gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Analytical Chemistry, 65(8), 976–982. doi:10.1021/ac00056a005

[ table of contents | back to top ]

Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
castcast number unitless
stationstation number unitless
date_utc_YYYYMMDD_startdate, UTC, given as year – month – day unitless
time_utc_HHMM_starttime, UTC, given as hour – minute unitless
event_startthe event number from the ELOG maintained during the cruise unitless
depth_mdepth in meters meter (m)
lat_startlatitude decimal degrees
lon_startlongitude decimal degrees
TOS_nMtotal organic sulfur, in nM nanomolar (nM)
TOS_sdstandard deviation for total organic sulfur, from averages of replicates where available nanomolar (nM)


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Niskin bottle
Generic Instrument Name
Niskin bottle
Dataset-specific Description
Whole seawater samples for obtaining the concentration of total organic sulfur (TOS) were collected directly from the Niskin bottles into combusted 40 mL glass vials.
Generic Instrument Description
A Niskin bottle (a next generation water sampler based on the Nansen bottle) is a cylindrical, non-metallic water collection device with stoppers at both ends. The bottles can be attached individually on a hydrowire or deployed in 12, 24 or 36 bottle Rosette systems mounted on a frame and combined with a CTD. Niskin bottles are used to collect discrete water samples for a range of measurements including pigments, nutrients, plankton, etc.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
ion chromatography
Generic Instrument Name
Ion Chromatograph
Dataset-specific Description
In brief, a sample is pumped through three ion exchange cartridges connected in series, a 1 mL Ba (Dionex OnGuard II #057093) to remove most of the sulfate, then through a 2.5 mL Ag (Dionex OnGuard II Ag #057090) to remove chloride, and finally through a 1 mL cartridge packed with BioRad AG 4x4 resin (#143-3341) to remove the remaining sulfate. The resulting sample is then analyzed via ion chromatography to quantify remaining sulfate.
Generic Instrument Description
Ion chromatography is a form of liquid chromatography that measures concentrations of ionic species by separating them based on their interaction with a resin. Ionic species separate differently depending on species type and size. Ion chromatographs are able to measure concentrations of major anions, such as fluoride, chloride, nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate, as well as major cations such as lithium, sodium, ammonium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium in the parts-per-billion (ppb) range. (from http://serc.carleton.edu/microbelife/research_methods/biogeochemical/ic....)


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Deployments

KN210-04

Website
Platform
R/V Knorr
Start Date
2013-03-25
End Date
2013-05-09
Description
Western Atlantic cruise started at Montevideo, Uruguay and ended at Bridgetown, Barbados. Science Objectives: 1. Characterize deep ocean dissolved organic matter in water masses of western Atlantic Ocean. 2. Characterize microbial community at selected stations and at selected depths. 3. Characterize metabolic capabilities of surface, mesopelagic and bathypelagic microbial consortia vis-a-vis the degradation of organic matter from each zone. 4. Examine metabolic and phylogenetic links between microbes in different marine zones (surface, meso-pelagic and bathypelagic depths). Science Activities: 1. Collection of discrete water samples by Niskin-bottles. 2. Collection of microbial communities from these water samples, by in-situ pumping, or by net-traps and net-tows. 3. Incubation experiments in lab and on deck. 4. Underway mass spectrometry and flow cytometry, from seawater intake. More information is available from the WHOI Cruise Planning Synopsis. Additional cruise information and original data are available from the NSF R2R Data Catalog.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Project Information

Dissolved Organic Matter Composition in the Deep Atlantic Ocean (Deep Atlantic DOM)

Coverage: Western Atlantic Ocean


Transformations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the deep ocean have profound impacts on the global carbon cycle due to the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) away from the atmosphere. Although research has been conducted on the high molecular weight component of this material, the same cannot be said for low molecular weight DOM because the needed analytical techniques have not been available to determine its composition and reactivity. In recent years, a research team at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has acquired the necessary analytical capability. As such, in this project, they will carry out the first systematic survey of deep ocean DOM in the western Atlantic Ocean to characterize the low molecular weight fraction of DOM in southward flowing North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), northward flowing Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). Using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and multi-stage fragmentation coupled to liquid chromatography, the scientists will determine the spatial variability in the composition of DOM along the flow path of the water masses, as well as assess the source water, transport, and surface processes that contribute to temporal changes in DOM composition. These results will be augmented with structural elucidation and quantitative assays of unique marker compounds for each water mass. Results will provide important insights into the biogeochemical reactions that govern DOM dynamics in the deep ocean.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Program Information

Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB)


Coverage: Global


The Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) program focuses on the ocean's role as a component of the global Earth system, bringing together research in geochemistry, ocean physics, and ecology that inform on and advance our understanding of ocean biogeochemistry. The overall program goals are to promote, plan, and coordinate collaborative, multidisciplinary research opportunities within the U.S. research community and with international partners. Important OCB-related activities currently include: the Ocean Carbon and Climate Change (OCCC) and the North American Carbon Program (NACP); U.S. contributions to IMBER, SOLAS, CARBOOCEAN; and numerous U.S. single-investigator and medium-size research projects funded by U.S. federal agencies including NASA, NOAA, and NSF. The scientific mission of OCB is to study the evolving role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle, in the face of environmental variability and change through studies of marine biogeochemical cycles and associated ecosystems. The overarching OCB science themes include improved understanding and prediction of: 1) oceanic uptake and release of atmospheric CO2 and other greenhouse gases and 2) environmental sensitivities of biogeochemical cycles, marine ecosystems, and interactions between the two. The OCB Research Priorities (updated January 2012) include: ocean acidification; terrestrial/coastal carbon fluxes and exchanges; climate sensitivities of and change in ecosystem structure and associated impacts on biogeochemical cycles; mesopelagic ecological and biogeochemical interactions; benthic-pelagic feedbacks on biogeochemical cycles; ocean carbon uptake and storage; and expanding low-oxygen conditions in the coastal and open oceans.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

[ table of contents | back to top ]

This document is created by info v 4.1f 5 Oct 2018 from the content of the BCO-DMO metadata database.    2019-10-21  22:24:28