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    Physical and chemical properties of surface seawater obtained by CTD from the R/V Melville (MV1405) cruise along the coast of California in July 2014.
    
  
  
    
    

Physical and chemical properties of surface seawater obtained by CTD from the R/V Melville (MV1405) cruise along the coast of California in July 2014.

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/663717
Data Type: Cruise Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2016-10-28

Project
» Investigating the Ecological Importance of Iron Storage in Diatoms (diatom iron storage)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Marchetti, AdrianUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill)Principal Investigator
Cohen, NatalieUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill)Contact
Ake, HannahWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
Physical and chemical properties of surface seawater obtained by CTD from the R/V Melville (MV1405) cruise along the coast of California in July 2014.


Dataset Description

Physical and chemical properties of surface seawater obtained by CTD (5m) in close proximity to where seawater was collected for incubation experiments.


Processing Description

BCO-DMO Data Processing Notes:

-reformatted column names to comply with BCO-DMO standards


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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
Q_IDIncubation sample ID unitless
dateDate sampling occurred (GMT); mm/dd/yy unitless
start_timeTime sampling occurred (GMT); HH:MM unitless
lat_incubationsLatitude where water samples for incubations were collected; N is positive decimal degrees
lon_incubationsLongitude where water samples for incubations were collected; E is positive decimal degrees
lat_CTDLatitude where CTD samples were collected; N is positive decimal degrees
lon_CTDLongitude where CTD samples were collected; E is positive decimal degrees
tempTemperature of water at CTD sampling site celsius
salinitySalinity of water from CTD sampling site practical salinity units (PSU)
conductivityConductivity from CTD sampling site uS/cm
PARPAR from CTD sampling site umol photons/square meter


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
CTD
Generic Instrument Name
CTD profiler
Dataset-specific Description
Used to collect water samples
Generic Instrument Description
The Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) unit is an integrated instrument package designed to measure the conductivity, temperature, and pressure (depth) of the water column. The instrument is lowered via cable through the water column and permits scientists observe the physical properties in real time via a conducting cable connecting the CTD to a deck unit and computer on the ship. The CTD is often configured with additional optional sensors including fluorometers, transmissometers and/or radiometers. It is often combined with a Rosette of water sampling bottles (e.g. Niskin, GO-FLO) for collecting discrete water samples during the cast. This instrument designation is used when specific make and model are not known.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
GeoFish Sampler
Generic Instrument Name
GeoFish Towed near-Surface Sampler
Dataset-specific Description
Used to collect seawater
Generic Instrument Description
The GeoFish towed sampler is a custom designed near surface (

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Teflon dual-diaphragm pump
Generic Instrument Name
Pump
Dataset-specific Description
Pumped seawater directly into a positive pressure trace-metal clean bubble constructed in the main laboratory of the ship.
Generic Instrument Description
A pump is a device that moves fluids (liquids or gases), or sometimes slurries, by mechanical action. Pumps can be classified into three major groups according to the method they use to move the fluid: direct lift, displacement, and gravity pumps


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Deployments

MV1405

Website
Platform
R/V Melville
Start Date
2014-07-03
End Date
2014-07-26
Description
Deployment MV1405 on R/V Melville. Cruise took place during July 2014.


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Project Information

Investigating the Ecological Importance of Iron Storage in Diatoms (diatom iron storage)

Coverage: North Pacific, California coast and subarctic gyre


Extracted from the NSF award abstract: Diatoms are responsible for a significant fraction of primary production in the ocean. They are associated with enhanced carbon export and usually dominate the response of phytoplankton to additions of the micronutrient iron in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. Diatoms, particularly those isolated from the open ocean, appear to have a significant capacity to store iron for later use, and in some groups of diatoms this ability is enabled by the iron storage protein ferritin. Such luxury uptake of iron has long been observed in laboratory cultures and hypothesized to provide diatoms with an ecological benefit in the low-iron waters that cover 40% of the global ocean. However iron storage has been difficult to observe in natural systems due to the methodological challenges of working with mixed plankton assemblages, and a physiological understanding of the impacts of iron on ocean diatoms is lacking. This project combines state-of-the-art high-throughput transcriptomic sequencing and single-cell element analysis with novel laboratory and field incubation experiments to quantify iron storage abilities of cultured and natural diatoms that either contain or lack ferritin and determine the ecological impacts of this process. The overall objective of this project is to examine the ecological importance of iron storage as a selective mechanism controlling the distributions of diatoms along iron gradients in marine ecosystems. The proposed research includes three specific objectives: A. Determine if there is a consistent physiological difference in the ability of pennate versus centric diatoms to store iron. B. Examine whether iron storage capacities across diverse diatom taxa consistently provide a mechanistic explanation for continued growth in the absence of iron. C. Determine whether enhanced iron storage provides diatoms with a competitive within natural phytoplankton assemblages in both coastal and oceanic regions. Transcriptomic sequencing on a variety of ecologically important pennate and centric diatoms will be used to survey for the presence of ferritin-like genes in order to establish biogeographical and/or phylogenetic patterns of occurrence of diatom ferritin. Laboratory culture experiments will be used to quantify the iron storage abilities of these diatoms, as well as the number of cell divisions that can be supported by the stored iron, providing valuable physiological data to inform the understanding of plankton ecology in iron-limited coastal and HNLC systems. The laboratory experiments will be complemented by measurements of ferritin expression and iron storage in coastal and ocean diatoms sampled across gradients of iron availability on two cruises-of-opportunity to the northeast Pacific Ocean. The NCBI bioproject page can be found here.


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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

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This document is created by info v 4.1f 5 Oct 2018 from the content of the BCO-DMO metadata database.    2019-10-21  22:19:41