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    Acropora cervicornis population data during bleaching events from shoreside Florida_Coral_Reefs Coral_Bleaching_FRRP in the Florida Reef Tract from 2014-2015 (EMUCoReS project)
    
  
  
    
    

Acropora cervicornis population data during bleaching events from shoreside Florida_Coral_Reefs Coral_Bleaching_FRRP in the Florida Reef Tract from 2014-2015 (EMUCoReS project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/640238
Data Type: Other Field Results
Version: final
Version Date: 2016-03-11

Project
» RAPID: A hyper-thermal anomaly in the Florida Reef Tract: An opportunity to explore the mechanisms underpinning patterns of coral bleaching and disease (EMUCoReS)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Rodriguez-Lanetty, MauricioFlorida International University (FIU)Principal Investigator
Lirman, DiegoUniversity of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (UM-RSMAS)Co-Principal Investigator, Contact
Richardson, LaurieFlorida International University (FIU)Co-Principal Investigator
Allison, DickyWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

Regional Acropora cervicornis data during summer bleaching events in 2014 and 2015.
 

Description of this ongoing study: Coral Bleaching Response Plan.


Acquisition Description

Colonies of Acropora cervicornis were surveyed for annual Florida Reef Resilience Program (FRRP) Disturbance Response Monitoring during the summers of 2014 and 2015. At each site, two independent 1x10m belt transects were randomly placed and indicators were then recorded for all stony corals greater than 4cm including: 1) hard coral size (maximum height and diameter) and 2) hard coral condition as determined by the presence of bleaching and paling, presence of disease, and percent recent or old morality. 

A full description of the FRRP program is available at their website: www.frrp.org.


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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
yearyear of observation 2014 or 2015
regionregions of the reefs around Florida being studied text
sitesample number of the coral being studied alphanumeric
latlatitude of observation decimal degrees
lonlongitude of observation; West is negative decimal degrees
speciesspecies being documented taxonomic binomial
diameterdiameter of the fragment being measured; maximum diameter is defined as the outward-facing surface of the colony (perpendicular to the axis of growth);includes both living and dead areas of the colony centimeter
heightheight of the fragment being measured; maximum height is parallel to the axis of growth when viewed from the side of the colony centimeters
mortality_oldcharacterized by the absence of any corallite structure and often overgrown by algae or invertebrates;(does not include whole colonies that are dead) percentage
mortality_recentcharacterized by algae-free and intact or slightly eroded calyx structure in the absence of any living tissue percentage
colony_isolatesthe number of isolated tissue fragments on the colony number
bleachingcoral described by severity of discoloration; P = Pale (discoloration of coral tissue) PB = Partly Bleached (patches of fully bleached or white tissue) BL = Bleached (Tissue is totally white; no zooxanthallae visible) text
diseasecoral observed to have diseases of these color categories; WB = White band; UK = unknown text

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Deployments

Coral_Bleaching_FRRP

Website
Platform
shoreside Florida_Coral_Reefs
Start Date
2014-01-01
End Date
2015-08-20
Description
Coral reef surveys as part of  the project "RAPID: A hyper-thermal anomaly in the Florida Reef Tract: An opportunity to explore the mechanisms underpinning patterns of coral bleaching and disease". Single location entered: Florida Reef Tract, 24.8684, -80.6435 in order to 'ground' the datasets.

Acquisition Description
Central location for this whole study.


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Project Information

RAPID: A hyper-thermal anomaly in the Florida Reef Tract: An opportunity to explore the mechanisms underpinning patterns of coral bleaching and disease (EMUCoReS)

Coverage: Florida Reef Tract (24.868358, -80.643495)


Description from NSF award abstract: Coral reefs are among the most biologically diverse and economically important ecosystems on the planet. However, coral reefs are in a state of global decline due to effects of climate change, disease outbreaks, and other stressors. Mass coral bleaching events, a breakdown of the association between corals and their symbiotic algae, are predicted to become more frequent and severe in response to climate change, and it is expected that subsequent disease outbreaks will become more common. Beginning in August 2014, nearly all coral species in the Florida Reef Tract have undergone severe bleaching, in some cases followed by coral mortality and/or disease outbreaks. This widespread, thermal-induced event presents a unique time-sensitive opportunity to explore the mechanisms underpinning the patterns of coral bleaching, disease, and recovery. The mechanisms linking patterns of bleaching, disease, mortality, and recovery remain relatively unexplored. This research will explore the influences that genotype combinations of host polyps, their algal symbionts, and associated bacterial have on bleaching/disease likelihood and recovery/mortality predisposition of coral specimens. By providing a mechanistic understanding of the processes that underlie coral bleaching and subsequent recovery this research will contribute to measures in support of preserving this invaluable natural resource. The study will further involve students from diverse backgrounds as well as provide project internship opportunities for high school students. A web based radio blog will disseminate project results and other relevant developments to the broad audiences Mass coral bleaching events are predicted to become more frequent and severe in response to climate change, and it is expected that subsequent disease outbreaks will become more common. The lack of a baseline genetic datasets for coral holobionts prior to previous natural bleaching events has hindered our understanding of recovery patterns and physiological tolerance to thermal stress, also known as coral bleaching. An extensive pre-thermal stress baseline of genotypic identity of coral hosts, Symbiodinium, and associated bacterial community offers a unique opportunity to analyze changes associated with current bleaching event along the Florida coastline and to document holobiont compositions most and least resistant/resilient to bleaching and disease. Repeated sampling of the same coral colonies will allow the investigators to compare holobiont composition before, during and after bleaching of both healthy and diseased individuals. This bleaching event is a time-sensitive natural experiment to examine the dynamics of microbes (Symbiodinium and bacteria) associated with affected colonies, including their potential influence on disease susceptibility and resistance of reef corals. This effort would constitute the first time that high throughput sequencing of coral, Symbiodinium endosymbiont, and the coral-associated bacterial community genotypes are together used to explain patterns of disease, recovery, and mortality following natural bleaching. This study will likely change the way investigators study emerging wasting diseases of keystone species that define marine benthic communities.


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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

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This document is created by info v 4.1f 5 Oct 2018 from the content of the BCO-DMO metadata database.    2020-02-18  15:04:30