[Directory] [Data...]

Data server object:  coral_calc




  
    Experimental results of calcification rates of corals at variable pCO2 from the Richard B Gump Research Station, Moorea, French Polynesia in 2011 (MCR LTER project, OA_Corals project)
    
  
  
    
    

Experimental results of calcification rates of corals at variable pCO2 from the Richard B Gump Research Station, Moorea, French Polynesia in 2011 (MCR LTER project, OA_Corals project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/518462
Data Type: experimental
Version: 2014-07-09

Project
» Moorea Coral Reef Long-Term Ecological Research site (MCR LTER)
» RUI: Ocean Acidification- Category 1- The effects of ocean acidification on the organismic biology and community ecology of corals, calcified algae, and coral reefs (OA_Corals)

Programs
» Long Term Ecological Research network (LTER)
» Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability NSF-Wide Investment (SEES): Ocean Acidification (formerly CRI-OA) (SEES-OA)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Comeau, SteeveCalifornia State University Northridge (CSU-Northridge)Lead Principal Investigator
Carpenter, RobertCalifornia State University Northridge (CSU-Northridge)Co-Principal Investigator
Edmunds, Peter J.California State University Northridge (CSU-Northridge)Co-Principal Investigator
Kinkade, DanieWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

These data were obtained during an experiment performed in August-September-October 2011 and 2012 in French Polynesia. Calcification rates were measured in 8 corals (Porites rus, massive Porites, Porites irregularis, Pocillopora damicornis, Pocillopora verrucosa, Psammacora profundacella, Pavona cactus, Acropora pulchra) at 6 pCO2.

Related References:

Comeau, S., Edmunds, P. J., Spindel, N. B., Carpenter, R. C. (2014). Fast coral reef calcifiers are more sensitive to ocean acidification in short-term laboratory incubations. Limnology and Oceanography, 59(3), 1081–1091. doi:10.4319/lo.2014.59.3.1081

Comeau, S., Edmunds, P. J., Spindel, N. B., Carpenter, R. C. (2013) The responses of eight coral reef calcifiers to increasing partial pressure of CO2 do not exhibit a tipping point. Limnol. Oceanogr. 58, 388–398.

Related datasets:
algae_calcification
carbonate_chemistry
light_dark_calcification
mean_calcification
calcification rates - flume expt
carbonate chemistry - flume expt


Acquisition Description

For the carbonate chemistry:

Seawater pH was measured twice a day (08:00 hrs and 18:00 hrs) in each incubation tank, using a pH meter (Orion, 3-stars mobile) calibrated every 2-3 d on the total scale using Tris/HCl buffers (Dickson, San Diego, USA) with a salinity of 34.5. Total alkalinity of the seawater in the tanks was measured every 2 d, using single samples drawn from each tank in glass-stoppered bottles (250 mL). Samples were analyzed for total alkalinity within 1 d using open cell, potentiometric titration and an automatic titrator (T50, Mettler-Toledo). Titrations were conducted on 50-mL samples at ~ 24 °C, and total alkalinity calculated as described by Dickson et al. [2007]. Titrations of certified reference materials (CRM) provided by A. G. Dickson (batch 105) yielded total alkalinity values within 3.8 umol kg-1 of the nominal value (SD = 3.1 umol kg-1; n = 19). Salinity in the experimental tanks was measured every 2 d using a conductivity meter (YSI 3100). Total alkalinity, pH on the total scale (pHT), temperature, and salinity were used to calculate the carbonate chemsitry using the seacarb package (Lavigne and Gattuso 2012) running in R software (R Foundation for Statistical Computing).

Calcification:

Buoyant weight (± 1 mg) was recorded before and after the 15 d of incubation (following 15 d of acclimation), and the difference between the two was converted to dry weight using an aragonite density of 2.93 g cm^-3 for corals. Calcification was normalized to surface area estimated using aluminum foil for corals.


Processing Description

Parameters of the carbonate system in seawater were calculated from salinity, temperature, AT and pHT using the R package seacarb (Lavigne and Gattuso 2011).


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
species_coralCoral species used during experiment. dimensionless
treatment_pCO2pCO2 concentration for each species treatment. microatmospheres
rate_calcificationCalcification in corals normalized by surface area. mg CaCO3 cm-2 d-1
labName of laboratory where experiments were conducted. dimensionless
latLatitude component of geographic location of laboratory. decimal degrees
lonLongitude component of geographic location of laboratory. decimal degrees


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
pH Sensor
Generic Instrument Name
pH Sensor
Generic Instrument Description
An instrument that measures the hydrogen ion activity in solutions. The overall concentration of hydrogen ions is inversely related to its pH.  The pH scale ranges from 0 to 14 and indicates whether acidic (more H+) or basic (less H+). 

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Automatic titrator
Generic Instrument Name
Automatic titrator
Generic Instrument Description
Instruments that incrementally add quantified aliquots of a reagent to a sample until the end-point of a chemical reaction is reached.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Deployments

lab_Carpenter_Moorea

Website
Platform
Richard B Gump Research Station - Moorea LTER
Start Date
2011-07-17
End Date
2011-08-12
Description
Laboratory experiments carried out by R. Carpenter and P. Edmunds of California State University Northridge at the Richard B. Gump Research Station in French Polynesia, for the project "RUI: Ocean Acidification- Category 1- The effects of ocean acidification on the organismic biology and community ecology of corals, calcified algae, and coral reefs".


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Project Information

Moorea Coral Reef Long-Term Ecological Research site (MCR LTER)


Coverage: Island of Moorea, French Polynesia


From http://www.lternet.edu/sites/mcr/ and http://mcr.lternet.edu/:
The Moorea Coral Reef LTER site encompasses the coral reef complex that surrounds the island of Moorea, French Polynesia (17°30'S, 149°50'W). Moorea is a small, triangular volcanic island 20 km west of Tahiti in the Society Islands of French Polynesia. An offshore barrier reef forms a system of shallow (mean depth ~ 5-7 m), narrow (~0.8-1.5 km wide) lagoons around the 60 km perimeter of Moorea. All major coral reef types (e.g., fringing reef, lagoon patch reefs, back reef, barrier reef and fore reef) are present and accessible by small boat.

The MCR LTER was established in 2004 by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and is a partnership between the University of California Santa Barbara and California State University, Northridge. MCR researchers include marine scientists from the UC Santa Barbara, CSU Northridge, UC Davis, UC Santa Cruz, UC San Diego, CSU San Marcos, Duke University and the University of Hawaii. Field operations are conducted from the UC Berkeley Richard B. Gump South Pacific Research Station on the island of Moorea, French Polynesia.

MCR LTER Data: The Moorea Coral Reef (MCR) LTER data are managed by and available directly from the MCR project data site URL shown above.  The datasets listed below were collected at or near the MCR LTER sampling locations, and funded by NSF OCE as ancillary projects related to the MCR LTER core research themes.

The following publications and data resulted from this project:

2012 Edmunds PJ. Effect of pCO2 on the growth, respiration, and photophysiology of massive Porites spp. in Moorea, French Polynesia. Marine Biology 159: 2149-2160. doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.820375
Porites growth_respiration_photophys
Download complete data for this publication (Excel file)


RUI: Ocean Acidification- Category 1- The effects of ocean acidification on the organismic biology and community ecology of corals, calcified algae, and coral reefs (OA_Corals)

Coverage: Moorea, French Polynesia


While coral reefs have undergone unprecedented changes in community structure in the past 50 y, they now may be exposed to their gravest threat since the Triassic. This threat is increasing atmospheric CO2, which equilibrates with seawater and causes ocean acidification (OA). In the marine environment, the resulting decline in carbonate saturation state (Omega) makes it energetically less feasible for calcifying taxa to mineralize; this is a major concern for coral reefs. It is possible that the scleractinian architects of reefs will cease to exist as a mineralized taxon within a century, and that calcifying algae will be severely impaired. While there is a rush to understand these effects and make recommendations leading to their mitigation, these efforts are influenced strongly by the notion that the impacts of pCO2 (which causes Omega to change) on calcifying taxa, and the mechanisms that drive them, are well-known. The investigators believe that many of the key processes of mineralization on reefs that are potentially affected by OA are only poorly known and that current knowledge is inadequate to support the scaling of OA effects to the community level. It is vital to measure organismal-scale calcification of key taxa, elucidate the mechanistic bases of these responses, evaluate community scale calcification, and finally, to conduct focused experiments to describe the functional relationships between these scales of mineralization.

This project is a 4-y effort focused on the effects of Ocean Acidification (OA) on coral reefs at multiple spatial and functional scales. The project focuses on the corals, calcified algae, and coral reefs of Moorea, French Polynesia, establishes baseline community-wide calcification data for the detection of OA effects on a decadal-scale, and builds on the research context and climate change focus of the Moorea Coral Reef LTER.

This project is a hypothesis-driven approach to compare the effects of OA on reef taxa and coral reefs in Moorea. The PIs will utilize microcosms to address the impacts and mechanisms of OA on biological processes, as well as the ecological processes shaping community structure. Additionally, studies of reef-wide metabolism will be used to evaluate the impacts of OA on intact reef ecosystems, to provide a context within which the experimental investigations can be scaled to the real world, and critically, to provide a much needed reference against which future changes can be gauged.

The following publications and data resulted from this project:

2016    Edmunds P.J. and 15 others.  Integrating the effects of ocean acidification across functional scales on tropical coral reefs.  Bioscience (in press Feb 2016) **not yet available**

2016    Comeau S, Carpenter RC, Lantz CA, Edmunds PJ.  Parameterization of the response of calcification to temperature and pCO2 in the coral Acropora pulchra and the alga Lithophyllum kotschyanum.  Coral Reefs (in press Feb 2016)

2016    Brown D., Edmunds P.J.  Differences in the responses of three scleractinians and the hydrocoral Millepora platyphylla to ocean acidification.  Marine Biology (in press Feb 2016) **available soon**
MarBio. 2016: calcification and biomass
MarBio. 2016: tank conditions

2016    Comeau, S., Carpenter, R.C., Edmunds, P.J.  Effects of pCO2 on photosynthesis and respiration of tropical scleractinian corals and calcified algae.  ICES Journal of Marine Science doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsv267

2015    Evensen NR, Edmunds PJ, Sakai K.  Effects of pCO2 on the capacity for spatial competition by the corals Montipora aequituberculata and massive Porites spp. Marine Ecology Progress Series 541: 123–134. doi: 10.3354/meps11512
MEPS 2015: chemistry
MEPS 2015: field survey
MEPS 2015: linear extension
Download data for this publication (Excel file)

2015    Comeau S., Lantz C. A., Edmunds P. J., Carpenter R. C. Framework of barrier reefs threatened by ocean acidification. Global Change Biology doi: 10.1111/gcb.13023

2015    Comeau, S., Carpenter, R. C., Lantz, C. A., and Edmunds, P. J. Ocean acidification accelerates dissolution of experimental coral reef communities, Biogeosciences, 12, 365-372, doi:10.5194/bg-12-365-2015.
calcification rates - flume expt
carbonate chemistry - flume expt
External data repository: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.847986

2014    Comeau S, Carpenter RC, Edmunds PJ.  Effects of irradiance on the response of the coral Acropora pulchra and the calcifying alga Hydrolithon reinboldii to temperature elevation and ocean acidification.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology (in press)

2014    Comeau S, Carpenter RC, Nojiri Y, Putnam HM, Sakai K, Edmunds PJ.  Pacific-wide contrast highlights resistance of reef calcifiers to ocean acidification.  Royal Society of London (B) 281: doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.1339
External data repository: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.832834

2014    Comeau, S., Edmunds, P. J., Lantz, C. A., & Carpenter, R. C. Water flow modulates the response of coral reef communities to ocean acidification. Scientific Reports, 4. doi:10.1038/srep06681
calcification rates - flume expt
carbonate chemistry - flume expt

2014    Comeau, S., Edmunds, P. J., Spindel, N. B., & Carpenter, R. C. Fast coral reef calcifiers are more sensitive to ocean acidification in short-term laboratory incubations. Limnology and Oceanography, 59(3), 1081–1091. doi:10.4319/lo.2014.59.3.1081
algae_calcification
coral_calcification
External data repository: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.832584

2014    Comeau S, Edmunds PJ, Spindel NB, Carpenter RC.  Diel pCO2 oscillations modulate the response of the coral Acropora hyacinthus to ocean acidification. Marine Ecology Progress Series 453: 28-35

2013    Comeau, S, Carpenter, RC, Edmunds PJ. Response to coral reef calcification: carbonate, bicarbonate and proton flux under conditions of increasing ocean acidification. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London 280: doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.1153

2013    Comeau S, Carpenter RC. Edmunds PJ.  Effects of feeding and light intensity on the response of the coral Porites rus to ocean acidification.  Marine Biology 160: 1127-1134
External data repository: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.829815

2013    Comeau, S., Edmunds, P. J., Spindel, N. B., Carpenter, R. C. The responses of eight coral reef calcifiers to increasing partial pressure of CO2 do not exhibit a tipping point. Limnol. Oceanogr. 58, 388–398.
algae_calcification
coral_calcification
External data repository: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.833687

2012    Comeau, S., Carpenter, R. C., & Edmunds, P. J. Coral reef calcifiers buffer their response to ocean acidification using both bicarbonate and carbonate. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 280(1753), 20122374. doi:10.1098/rspb.2012.2374
carbonate_chemistry
light_dark_calcification
mean_calcification
External data repository: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.832834



[ table of contents | back to top ]

Program Information

Long Term Ecological Research network (LTER)


Coverage: United States


adapted from http://www.lternet.edu/

The National Science Foundation established the LTER program in 1980 to support research on long-term ecological phenomena in the United States. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network is a collaborative effort involving more than 1800 scientists and students investigating ecological processes over long temporal and broad spatial scales. The LTER Network promotes synthesis and comparative research across sites and ecosystems and among other related national and international research programs. The LTER research sites represent diverse ecosystems with emphasis on different research themes, and cross-site communication, network publications, and research-planning activities are coordinated through the LTER Network Office.

LTER site location map

2017 LTER research site map obtained from https://lternet.edu/site/lter-network/


Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability NSF-Wide Investment (SEES): Ocean Acidification (formerly CRI-OA) (SEES-OA)


Coverage: global


NSF Climate Research Investment (CRI) activities that were initiated in 2010 are now included under Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability NSF-Wide Investment (SEES). SEES is a portfolio of activities that highlights NSF's unique role in helping society address the challenge(s) of achieving sustainability. Detailed information about the SEES program is available from NSF (https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504707).

In recognition of the need for basic research concerning the nature, extent and impact of ocean acidification on oceanic environments in the past, present and future, the goal of the SEES: OA program is to understand (a) the chemistry and physical chemistry of ocean acidification; (b) how ocean acidification interacts with processes at the organismal level; and (c) how the earth system history informs our understanding of the effects of ocean acidification on the present day and future ocean.

Solicitations issued under this program:
NSF 10-530, FY 2010-FY2011
NSF 12-500, FY 2012
NSF 12-600, FY 2013
NSF 13-586, FY 2014
NSF 13-586 was the final solicitation that will be released for this program.

PI Meetings:
1st U.S. Ocean Acidification PI Meeting(March 22-24, 2011, Woods Hole, MA)
2nd U.S. Ocean Acidification PI Meeting(Sept. 18-20, 2013, Washington, DC)
3rd U.S. Ocean Acidification PI Meeting (June 9-11, 2015, Woods Hole, MA – Tentative)

NSF media releases for the Ocean Acidification Program:

Press Release 10-186 NSF Awards Grants to Study Effects of Ocean Acidification

Discovery Blue Mussels "Hang On" Along Rocky Shores: For How Long?

Discovery nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) Discoveries - Trouble in Paradise: Ocean Acidification This Way Comes - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Press Release 12-179 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Ocean Acidification: Finding New Answers Through National Science Foundation Research Grants - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Press Release 13-102 World Oceans Month Brings Mixed News for Oysters

Press Release 13-108 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Natural Underwater Springs Show How Coral Reefs Respond to Ocean Acidification - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Press Release 13-148 Ocean acidification: Making new discoveries through National Science Foundation research grants

Press Release 13-148 - Video nsf.gov - News - Video - NSF Ocean Sciences Division Director David Conover answers questions about ocean acidification. - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Press Release 14-010 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Palau's coral reefs surprisingly resistant to ocean acidification - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Press Release 14-116 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems - US National Science Foundation (NSF)



[ table of contents | back to top ]

Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

[ table of contents | back to top ]

This document is created by info v 4.1f 5 Oct 2018 from the content of the BCO-DMO metadata database.    2022-01-19  23:53:20